Compass Security Blog

A Blog about Information Security...

Tag: PoC

SharePoint: Collaboration vs. XSS

SharePoint is a very popular browser-based collaboration and content management platform. Due to its high complexity, proprietary technology and confusing terminology it is often perceived as a black-box that IT and security professionals do not feel very comfortable with. These days, web security topics are well understood by many security professionals, penetration testers and vendors. But what […]

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SharePoint: How to collaborate with external parties?

Opening up an internal SharePoint farm to the Internet in order to share resources with external parties might seem a good idea, because it helps avoiding expensive infrastructure changes. However, in terms of security, this is not recommended because it does not sufficiently protect internal resources from external threats. The protection of internal resources hinges […]

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Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#1

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

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BeanShell puts Java Application Servers at Risk

Developers increasingly integrate BeanShell support into web applications to provide end users and administrators with a simple extension framework. But be warned! BeanShell support without appropriate access control will put the hosting web server at severe risk. An attacker could easily execute operating system calls and without appropriate system hardening such an attack will immediately result in full system compromise. The […]

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Retrospective about cache snooping

As it is known since at least 2006, a website is able to identify the domains a user previously visited, with some simple CSS hacks. This had great privacy implications, and browsers took steps to eliminate this problem. But in December 2011, lcamtuf presented a new proof of concept based on cache timings, which basically does the […]

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