Compass Security Blog

A Blog about Information Security...

Tag: HTML

SharePoint: Collaboration vs. XSS

SharePoint is a very popular browser-based collaboration and content management platform. Due to its high complexity, proprietary technology and confusing terminology it is often perceived as a black-box that IT and security professionals do not feel very comfortable with. These days, web security topics are well understood by many security professionals, penetration testers and vendors. But what […]

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SharePoint: How to collaborate with external parties?

Opening up an internal SharePoint farm to the Internet in order to share resources with external parties might seem a good idea, because it helps avoiding expensive infrastructure changes. However, in terms of security, this is not recommended because it does not sufficiently protect internal resources from external threats. The protection of internal resources hinges […]

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Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#1

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

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Subresource Integrity HTML Attribute

Websites nowadays are mostly built with different resources from other origins. For example, many sites include scripts or stylesheets like jQuery or Bootstrap from a Content Delivery Network (CDN). This induces that the webmasters implicitly trust the linked external sources. But what if an attacker can force the user to load the content from an […]

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Risks of DOM Based XSS due to “unsafe” JavaScript functions

Introduction Several native JavaScript functions or properties like .eval() and .innerHTML as well as several jQuery functions like .html() and .append() are considered as “unsafe”, but why? The reason is that they allow DOM manipulation using strings containing HTML code (e.g.”<b>This text is bold</b>“), which can lead to DOM Based Cross-Site Scripting vulnerabilities. To be […]

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