Compass Security Blog

Offensive Defense

Category: Web Application (page 1 of 4)

About TLS Perfect Forward Secrecy and Session Resumption

Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) is a concept in Transport Layer Security (TLS) that makes sure that even if attackers manage to gain access to the private key of a certificate, they are not able to decrypt communication from the past (or communication in the future, without using active man in the middle attacks). Or in other […]

Continue reading

SharePoint: Collaboration vs. XSS

SharePoint is a very popular browser-based collaboration and content management platform. Due to its high complexity, proprietary technology and confusing terminology it is often perceived as a black-box that IT and security professionals do not feel very comfortable with. These days, web security topics are well understood by many security professionals, penetration testers and vendors. But what […]

Continue reading

SharePoint: How to collaborate with external parties?

Opening up an internal SharePoint farm to the Internet in order to share resources with external parties might seem a good idea, because it helps avoiding expensive infrastructure changes. However, in terms of security, this is not recommended because it does not sufficiently protect internal resources from external threats. The protection of internal resources hinges […]

Continue reading

Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#2

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

Continue reading

How to reduce the threat from third-party includes

To achieve better-looking, more feature-rich and responsive applications, there is an ever-growing need to include resources from 3rd party domains into your web application. Common examples are JavaScript frameworks like jQuery or AngularJS, often distributed via a content delivery network (CDN), or even complete applications like Google Maps. But by including these resources, the security […]

Continue reading

Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#1

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

Continue reading

SAMLRequest Support for SAML Raider

About a year ago, the Burp extension SAML Raider [0] was released as a result of a bachelor thesis [1] in collaboration with Compass Security. This Burp extension automates most of the steps, which are necessary to test a SAML single sign-on process and perform according attacks. With SAML Raider, an authentication bypass vulnerability in a Service […]

Continue reading

Bypassing Content-Security-Policy with DNS prefetching

Introduction The Content Security Policy (CSP) is one of the main web-based security mechanisms which helps websites’ owners to reduce their risks caused by Cross-Site-Scripting (XSS) or code injection attacks [1]. The CSP is nothing more than a policy that defines from where and to where a something can be loaded and fetched. This is […]

Continue reading

Cross-Site Scripting

Cross-Site Scripting is harmless? Think again! Cross-Site Scripting, oftentimes referred to as “XSS”, is a common vulnerability of web applications. This vulnerability refers to the incorrect behavior of a web application to insufficiently encode user provided data when displaying it back to the user. If this is the case, attackers are able to inject malicious […]

Continue reading

Content-Security-Policy: misconfigurations and bypasses

Introduction The Content Security Policy (CSP) is a security mechanism web applications can use to reduce the risk of attacks based on XSS, code injection or clickjacking. Using different directives it is possible to lock down web applications by implementing a whitelist of trusted sources from which web resources like JavaScript may be loaded. Currently […]

Continue reading

Older posts