Compass Security Blog

Offensive Defense

Category: Hardening (page 1 of 2)

SharePoint: Collaboration vs. XSS

SharePoint is a very popular browser-based collaboration and content management platform. Due to its high complexity, proprietary technology and confusing terminology it is often perceived as a black-box that IT and security professionals do not feel very comfortable with. These days, web security topics are well understood by many security professionals, penetration testers and vendors. But what […]

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SharePoint: How to collaborate with external parties?

Opening up an internal SharePoint farm to the Internet in order to share resources with external parties might seem a good idea, because it helps avoiding expensive infrastructure changes. However, in terms of security, this is not recommended because it does not sufficiently protect internal resources from external threats. The protection of internal resources hinges […]

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Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#2

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

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Wrap-up: Hack-Lab 2017#1

What is a Hack-Lab? Compass Security provides a monthly playful occasion for the security analysts to get-together and try to hack new devices, dive into current technologies and share their skills with their fellows. This also includes the improvement of internal tools, the research of newly identified publicly known attacks, and security analysis of hardware […]

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XSLT Security and Server Side Request Forgery

Nowadays, a growing list of XSLT processors exist with the purpose of transforming XML documents to other formats such as PDF, HTML or SVG. To this end such processors typically offer a powerful set of functionalities – which, from a security point of view, can potentially pose severe risks. Within this post, we highlight some […]

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Exchange 2013 – Spot the Security Features

Microsoft Exchange 2013, the newest product in the Exchange series, is more and more enrolled in enterprise environments. With the new and enhanced features, for example the integration of SharePoint or Lync, the new Exchange is a well-designed piece of software which in parallel addresses different security concerns. Like Lync 2013 and the whole Microsoft […]

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Lync – Missing Security Features

Microsoft has published a list of key security features [1] and also their security framework [2] for the Lync Server 2013. Those documents show how deeply MS integrated their SDL in the Lync products. It also indicates that Lync provides a solid security base out of the box: Encryption enforced for all communication between Lync […]

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Lync – Privacy Configuration

We have shortly described the Lync federations in a previous post. With the usage of federations the question comes about the privacy and the security of the user’s information (e.g. presence information). There are scenarios where an employee doesn’t answer the phone but is mentioned as “available” in Lync. This could lead to a misunderstanding […]

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Lync – Top 5 Security Issues

Microsoft Lync Server (a combination of “link” and “sync”, see [6]) communications software offers instant messaging (IM), presence, conferencing, and telephony solutions. Lync can be integrated with SharePoint or Exchange to extend its functionalities. Users can e.g. search for specific skills within the Lync client when SharePoint integration is enabled. Exchange is used as a […]

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Compass SSL/TLS recommendations

Mozilla created an extensive page [7] concerning the best current choice of SSL/TLS cipher suites, primarily for web servers. Compass Security agrees broadly with the article, but recommends some additional restrictions in order to provide the most resistance against active and passive attacks versus TLS secured connections: Use 3DES cipher instead of RC4 Disable SSLv3 support […]

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