Compass Security Blog

Offensive Defense

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Keep your secrets really secret

Nowadays, we all relentlessly use search engines and developers extensively use version and source code control systems to keep track of their source code. Services such as Google or GitHub are great to search and retrieve information they gathered and stored. But when it comes to public indexing services, one big problem raises up: your whole […]

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Security Advisories for SAP BusinessObjects Explorer and neuroML

Compass Security employees identify and report on a regular basis security vulnerabilities as part of their daily assessments (or just out curiosity). Stefan Horlacher identified and reported back in June 2013 several flaws in SAP BusinessObjects Explorer. We’re happy to publish today the details as the flaws have been patched and a reasonable grace period […]

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Embedded devices and cell phone flash memory acquisition using JTAG

Back in Black (back from Black Hat with a bag full of schwag and branded black shirts).  Black Hat and DEF CON again allowed insights into latest research and concerns. Where some topics loose grip ( vulnerability scanning, IPv4, DNS, general web issues) others gain momentum (DDoS, mobile computing, smart energy, industrial control and embedded […]

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Compass Crew Member Speaking at Black Hat USA

Cyrill Brunschwiler’s talk was selected “among the very best research available today” to be presented side-by-side with the security industries top researchers on the world’s most renowned security conference – Black Hat USA in Las Vegas. He will be speaking on “Energy Fraud and Orchestrated Blackouts: Issues with Wireless Metering Protocols (wM-Bus)”. The work presented […]

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XSS – The never ending story

Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) has lost one rank in the newly released OWASP Top Ten 2013 candidate. Compared to the 2010 version, it’s now on rank three, overtaken by “Broken Authentication and Session Management”. Has XSS become less common then? No, I don’t think so. Compass Security has always been strong in web application security testing […]

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Samba Exploit Development Presentation

As penetration testers, our main goal is to identify as many vulnerabilities as possible. This allows our customers to more objectifly assess their security level and to shut as many doors as possible which an intruder could use to break in. This process needs to be based in respect of cost-benefit, depending on risk probabily […]

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Exploit credentials stored in Windows Group Policy Preferences

Group Policy preferences are a new feature set available since Windows Server 2008, which shouldn’t be confused with the well known Group Policy objects (GPOs) dating back to Windows NT. The main idea behind the creation of Group Policy preferences is the ability to push so-called “unmanaged” settings. Compared to “managed” GPOs, group policy preferences can be altered by […]

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Reversing in God Mode

Fridays, I was approaching a win32 reversing challenge. So I transferred the binary into my Windows XP virtual box and fired-up OllyDbg. The goal was to bypass the username and password prompt that occurred on application startup. Hilariously, I was just providing a dummy name and password to the app…. “asdf” “asdf” as probably most […]

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BeanShell puts Java Application Servers at Risk

Developers increasingly integrate BeanShell support into web applications to provide end users and administrators with a simple extension framework. But be warned! BeanShell support without appropriate access control will put the hosting web server at severe risk. An attacker could easily execute operating system calls and without appropriate system hardening such an attack will immediately result in full system compromise. The […]

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Retrospective about cache snooping

As it is known since at least 2006, a website is able to identify the domains a user previously visited, with some simple CSS hacks. This had great privacy implications, and browsers took steps to eliminate this problem. But in December 2011, lcamtuf presented a new proof of concept based on cache timings, which basically does the […]

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